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The UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre: Who We Are | What We Do | Working With Us | Get in Touch


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The UNEVOC Network: Learn About the Network | Explore the Network
For Members: UNEVOC Centre Dashboard


Skills for Work and Life

Thematic Areas: Youth Employment | Greening TVET | Access, Equity & Quality | TVET in a Digital World | Other Themes
Our Key Programmes & Projects: i-hubs: Skills for Innovation Hubs | YEM: Youth Employment in the Mediterranean | BILT: Bridging Innovation and Learning in TVET | UNEVOC TVET Leadership Programme | WYSD: World Youth Skills Day
Past Activities: TVET Global Forums


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Our Services & Resources: Publications | TVET Forum | Virtual Conferences | TVET Country Profiles | TVETipedia Glossary | Promising & Innovative Practices
Events: Major TVET Events | UNEVOC Network News



International Day of Women and Girls in Science

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science, celebrated on 11 February, is implemented by UNESCO and UN Women, in collaboration institutions and civil society partners that aim to promote women and girls in science. This Day is an opportunity to promote full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls.

Gender equality is a global priority for UNESCO, and the support of young girls, their education and their full ability to make their ideas heard are levers for development and peace. Tackling some of the greatest challenges of the Agenda for Sustainable Development -- from improving health to combating climate change -- will rely on harnessing all talent. That means getting more women working in these fields. Diversity in research expands the pool of talented researchers, bringing in fresh perspectives, talent and creativity. This Day is a reminder that women and girls play a critical role in science and technology communities and that their participation should be strengthened.

Join the conversation with #WomenInScience!


UNESCO-UNEVOC promotes gender equality in STEM-related TVET

Girls and women are particularly under-represented in fields requiring science, technology, engineering and mathematic (STEM) skills and knowledge. According to UNESCO's groundbreaking report Cracking the code: Girls’ and women’s education in STEM, only 35% of STEM students in higher education globally are women, and differences are observed within STEM disciplines. This under-representation is significant and detrimental to both individuals and society. In addition to being required for ‘traditional’ and ‘emerging’ occupations, STEM skills and knowledge are often needed for the so-called ‘jobs of the future’.

STEM-related technical and vocational education and training (TVET) has a significant role to play in providing the skills and competencies required to support innovation, productivity and international competitiveness. UNESCO-UNEVOC conducted a study on boosting gender equality in science and technology throughout 2019 and 2020. The report on this study was published at the end of 2020 and provides an overview of gender disparities in STEM-related TVET for ten countries. The ten case countries were selected in collaboration with members of UNESCO’s global platform of TVET institutions,the UNEVOC Network.


Boosting gender equality in science and technology

A challenge for TVET programmes and careers
While technical and vocational education and training (TVET) has the potential to bolster the participation of women in the labour market, this potential is not always well understood and capitalized on. In general, female students are lowly represen ...

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Global activities

Women scientists at the forefront of the fight against COVID-19

Online from Paris, France, 11 February 2021

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has been an awakening in many ways. It has clearly demonstrated the ingenuity of women researchers and their critical role in different stages of the fight against COVID 19, from advancing the knowledge on the virus to developing technics for testing and finally the vaccine against the virus.

Meanwhile, studies have shown that the COVID-19 pandemic has also had a significant negative impact on women scientists, particularly affecting those at early-career stages, thus widening of the existing gender gap in science. This, again, reveals gender disparities in the scientific system which need to be addressed by new policies, initiatives and mechanisms to support women and girls in science. This roundtable will gather experts working in fields related to the pandemic from different parts of the world.





 

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